Black Girl In Om — Oya Mae Duchess-Davis: Playwright and Santeria Practitioner.

Black Girl In Om — Oya Mae Duchess-Davis: Playwright and Santeria Practitioner.

We often look to the heavens for answers. Yearning to know we are not alone and some of us reach far enough that we become in tune with the connection between here and above. March represents heaven to earth here at BGIO. Practices, prayers, and rituals get us closer to what we’d all like to obtain: inner peace. Our beauty for March embodies this theme in all her majesty. Oya Mae Duchess-Davis is a Santeria practitioner, playwright, and disabled femme.

Black Girl In Om — Lauren Solomon: Yoga Instructor, Reiki Practitioner, and Birth Doula

Black Girl In Om — Lauren Solomon: Yoga Instructor, Reiki Practitioner, and Birth Doula

The month of February was representative of the Black Body here at BGIO. As we step into March, Women’s History Month, we carry forth that energy and continue to honor our ancestors and the generations carried inside our wombs. Lauren Solomon defines the intersections between all aspects of our body health.

Black Girl In Om — Chelsea Williams: Plant-based Public Health Specialist and Wellness Blogger

Black Girl In Om — Chelsea Williams: Plant-based Public Health Specialist and Wellness Blogger

I have many self-care and self-love practices. Lately, I’ve been taking inventory of my life and removing anything that’s not supporting me or my future goals. In the past, it was difficult for me to make the decision to remove myself from situations or end relationships that drained me. (Blame the September Libra in me!) I found myself on autopilot. Now, I’m making more intentional decisions as an act of self-love.

Black Girl In Om — Dr. Kristian H.: BLK+GRN Founder, Public Health Professor + Yoga Teacher

Black Girl In Om — Dr. Kristian H.: BLK+GRN Founder, Public Health Professor + Yoga Teacher

Community. Tribe. Support. When I began my wellness journey, I remember feeling really alone and isolated. I was breaking old habits, discovering new rituals, and at times it felt like the people around me simply didn’t understand. I thought I was the only Black girl in the wellness world until I found Black Girl In Om. In them, I found my community.

Black Girl In Om — Danielle Lyles Barton: Heart Healer + Spiritual Activist

Black Girl In Om — Danielle Lyles Barton: Heart Healer + Spiritual Activist

For me, it was yoga that did both. Yoga taught me how to reassociate into my body and how to process all the trauma that was living inside me. Yoga taught me how to breathe again. Literally. So when you talk about creating space for women of color to breathe easy, you are profoundly echoing my life’s journey. How could I not identify with Black Girl in Om’s mission? I am Her.

Black Girl In Om — Seobia Rivers: The Fitness and Health Creative

Black Girl In Om — Seobia Rivers: The Fitness and Health Creative

I recommend women of color create and adopt an empowering morning routine that’s consistent. This will look different for many people, but what’s important is getting rid of all the initial negative chatter we hear when we first wake up in the morning and replacing it with mantras, setting intentions, affirmations, prayers, encouraging music

Black Girl In Om—Lalah Delia: Writer, Spiritual Light, and Founder of Vibrate Higher Daily

Black Girl In Om—Lalah Delia: Writer, Spiritual Light, and Founder of Vibrate Higher Daily

Vibration expressing itself through the feminine and through the word ‘I’s’ many evolving titles: mother, daughter, sister, friend, comrade, overcomer, love, light, joy, peace, certified wellness practitioner, certified spiritual practitioner, creative, writer, teacher, student, lover of the ocean and high vibrational music, lover and advocate of all things wellness, sacred, liberation, and of all things that support and sustain vibrating higher. Founder of Vibrate Higher Daily.