Black Girl In Om—Shanna Tyler: Yoga Teacher, Social Worker, Blogger

Black Girl In Om—Shanna Tyler: Yoga Teacher, Social Worker, Blogger

Black Girl in Om means community. It means strengthening a community that needs to band together. Us, as women of color, are marginalized and oppressed for not only gender but race. What this movement signifies is us building each other up. We share our ideas, our triumphs, our stumbles, and our practices in order to help each other. That’s a beautiful thing!!

Black Girl In Om—Brandie Gilliam: Founder, Editor & Creative Director of Thoughtfully Magazine

Black Girl In Om—Brandie Gilliam: Founder, Editor & Creative Director of Thoughtfully Magazine

I'm also really into speaking words of purpose, affirmation, intention and faith over my life. I tell myself regularly that I'm more than enough, loved deeply and am more than capable and worthy. I haven't always felt completely confident in being me and it's been hard navigating this world as a women of color, but I've found so much healing in facing the insecurities, fears and hurts, and turning them around with the loving power of my words.

Brown Girl In Om—Nilsa Salgado: Soulpick Founder 

Brown Girl In Om—Nilsa Salgado: Soulpick Founder 

Black Girl in Om for me represents women of color coming together in a safe space to honor their connection with each other and their own unique individual journeys. It’s about demolishing the idea that we are competitors and “don’t wish to see each other do well.” It functions as a platform where we can instead share ideas centered around wellness freely with the sincere hope that it enriches the path taken by our sisters.

Black Girl In Om—J. Chavae: Light-working Creator + Healer

Black Girl In Om—J. Chavae: Light-working Creator + Healer

In my opinion, Black Girl In Om means a black woman vibrating at the same frequency of the universe and being aware of that superpower. Realizing that you are connected to everything and everyone around you, realizing that the same vibration that makes up the moon and the stars is also the same rhythm of who you are, realizing that you are tapped into “the Source”.

Black Girl In Om—Yaminah Mayo: Model, Writer, Artist and Affirmer

PHOTO: COURTESY YAMINAH MAYO

PHOTO: COURTESY YAMINAH MAYO

Interview by Lauren Ash

Some women just scream confidence, so when you find out that they're just like you—dealing with their own baggage (a la Badu), insecurities, and having to figure out how to be fully themselves in this messed up worldit makes you breathe a sigh of relief! Yaminah Mayo, aka Spicy Mayo, has been inspiring me with her Instagram posts, blog, and overall black girl exuberance since I first met her at Blavity's EmpowerHer conference last spring! We get to kiki with her and ALL YA'LL in NYC tonight, Friday, February 3rd, at our BGIO Happy Hour! Come through Vivrant Beauty between 6 and 8 p.m. to hang with us! Stay in touch with Yaminah by following her on Instagram @spicy.mayo and checking in with her blog where On Spicy Mayo readers can garner the perspective of a young woman grappling with career, mental and physical health. 

Who is Yaminah Mayo?

I am a model, writer, graphic artist, affirmer.

What does Black Girl In Om mean to you?

BGIO is a safe place. It's really great for women of color positively looking to find their way in the creative world. It reinforces the joy that one gets from uplifting each other and not "othering". 

How do you identify with Black Girl In Om's mission?

All your pillars are very important moral compasses for me. For example, physical, emotional, and mental wellness are critical for me getting through a NYC day. It's really hard here. However, knowing that there is a resource for me to go to when I need it pour back into myself is, within itself, comforting. Especially when it comes time to affirm and speak that prosperity into existence and I need guidance.

What are your self-care and self-love practices?

A self-care routine for me is shutting everything off. It's really hard because I have a tendency to be addicted to Twitter (I get my news there) but I know it's necessary when everyone starts speaking hyperbolically. I also binge watch Girlfriends or Living Single or Frasier. My new/old "ting" is baking and cooking while I watch Girlfriends, Living Single, or Frasier.
Oh yeah, and sometimes I'll take out my pent up frustrations in the gym.  

What's one ritual you recommend more women of color adopt to cultivate inner beauty and wellness?

OMG! Affirmations! I've been doing them since the new year and it is seriously decluttering my mind and I feel like my imposter syndrome is fading. Affirmations not only make you feel great about yourself but it teaches you how NOT to affirm the negative things you think about yourself. It helps me to interact with other and keeps me grounded in a grateful mindset. 

Girl, yas! I so loved how much YOU loved the Lifestyle with Ivory + Ash cards Deun Ivory and I sent your way! It's always great to connect with someone else who knows the power of affirmations and mantras! So, what's one wellness product you can't live without?

My blender or maca root. Both get the GOAT title.

Black Girl In Om—Desiree Verdejo: Beauty Entrepreneur

PHOTO: DESIREE VERDEJO

PHOTO: DESIREE VERDEJO

Interview by Lauren Ash

I'm so thrilled to venture out to NYC this weekend and kick of my yoga and self-care for women of color tour! In addition, BGIO Art Director Deun Ivory and I are thrilled to be able to partner with Desiree Verdejo, founder of Vivrant Beauty, on Friday, February 3rd at 6 p.m. for BGIO Happy Hour! We invite our BGIO NYC community to come out and mingle with us for good vibes in a beautiful space curated with women of color in mind! Learn more about the BGIO Beauty behind this lovely place and be sure to say hello to Desiree online

Who are you?

Hey, I'm Desiree, founder of Vivrant Beauty, a beauty boutique online and in NYC that caters to women of color. We curate natural haircare, clean skincare and premium makeup products to brown women and are proud of the fact that half of our product lines and growing are black-owned.

What does Black Girl In Om mean to you?

Black Girl In Om is a celebration of wellness, self-love and sisterhood.

How do you identify with Black Girl In Om's mission?

I am a Black Girl In Oma woman who appreciates the balance that inclusiveness, peace and self-care brings to my life but also how much more magical they can be when practiced with other black women. These principals are also weaved into the fabric of Vivrant Beauty, our beauty boutique that exists in the premium beauty world and the green beauty spacearenas that are not always mindful of the unique needs of Black women. 

What are your self-care and self-love practices?

I'm currently eight months pregnant and have never been more committed to my wellness practices than I am right now. Eating healthy colorful foods, stretching these hard-working limbs in prenatal yoga and committing to an indulgent beauty routine for my face and body (especially my growing belly) are all necessities.

PHOTO: DESIREE VERDEJO

PHOTO: DESIREE VERDEJO

Oh, congratulations! So happy for you and your family! What's one ritual you recommend more women of color adopt to cultivate inner beauty and wellness?

Society loves to portray images of black women arguing and attacking one another. For me its so empowering to find myself in a circle of likeminded black women whether its a church group, yoga circle or a bunch of fellow entrepreneurs or creatives. There is so much support and mental strength in finding a supportive sister circle and I encourage any woman of color without one to commit to seeking out such a network.

Absolutely, Desiree! So, what's one wellness product you can't live without?

I can't live without soy candles or natural face oils. I'm currently obsessed with a moisturizing facial oil by Yuli named Liquid Courage which leaves your skin so soft and glowy.

I'm going to have to try that out! How may we stay in touch with you?

My key links are www.vivrantbeauty.com and Instagram @vivrantbeautyny!

Black Girl In Om—Courtney Cobbs: Reiki Healer and Wellness Practitioner

Black Girl In Om—Courtney Cobbs: Reiki Healer and Wellness Practitioner

What's one ritual you recommend more women of color adopt to cultivate inner beauty and wellness?

I recommend more women of color carve out time to praise themselves. The frequency will vary for each person but the intent behind it is to boost yourself up, especially in a world that often doesn’t praise US. For years I was so critical of myself and once I started to see where that got me (see: not very far) I started to change how I talked to myself. I carve out time at least once a week to sit in the mirror and tell myself how much I love myself and all the excellent things I did during the week.